Rendering with Mpeg, the way I see it.
Rendering:-

This is the process that combines all the edited portions, titles, transitions to a single file.

Rendering not only takes time, but uses a lot of computer processing power.

I can reduce this time dramatically by trying to keep my settings as near to the final product as possible.

Video Studio used Smart Render Technology.
Basically the render process recodes every frame that has or needs to be changed.

One of the reasons for re-coding is to compress the file to fit a dvd.
So why is my file to big in the first place.
The main reason is that I have captured the video using the wrong settings.

The bit rate (kbps) directly controls the amount of memory used to store the video.
A dvd holds 4.3Gb of data.
My video file has to be 4.3Gb or less to fit a Dvd.

When I capture one hour of video footage I use a rate of 8000 kbps, this will produce a file 4.3 Gb in size. (best quality Dvd)
If I capture more than one hour I have to reduce the bit rate accordingly, otherwise my file will be to large to fit a dvd.

At 90 minutes I have to capture at a rate of 6000 kbps (good quality Dvd)
At 120 minutes I have to capture at a rate of 4000 kbps (vhs quality)
Each of these capture settings should produce a file approximately 4.3 Gb
To have a greater control and accuracy I use a bit rate calculator.

http://dvd-hq.info/Calculator.html


Ok so I have just captured 80 minutes of footage at 8000 kbps only to find my file is 5.7Gb
I have edited the project and am ready to make a dvd.
But first I have to render the video to one file to fit a dvd.
In order to achieve this I have to reduce the bit rate in order to reduce the file size. A setting of 6000 kbps is a good guide.

Three and a half hours later and the job is done. (that was a bit long)

On the other hand and with a bit of hindsight, if I had captured to 6000 kbps the render times would have been dramatically reduced.

In the first instance every frame had to undergo recoding as each frame had to be changed from 8000 to 6000 kbps.
The second-time using the same bit rate (6000), VS only had to recode the edited portions, significantly reducing rendering times.
Test 1
Captured 5 minutes video at 8000kbps
Cut video at 1 minute intervals.
Added colour clips to each end.
Added F/X transitions to each clip.
Share Create Video File to 6000kbps
Total time 13 minutes 05 seconds.
Test 2
Captured 5minutes video at 6000kbps
Cut video at 1 minute intervals.
Added colour clips to each end.
Added F/X transitions to each clip.
Share Create Video File to 6000kbps
Total time 2 minutes 50 seconds
Typical properties can be seen to the right.

This template was made using the Make Movie Manager.
It would be these settings that i would use through-out.

The only changes to be made are to the Bit Rate to match the
length of my video, and the Field Order, depending on my capture source.
MPEG files
24 Bits, 720 x 576, 25 fps
Lower Field First
(DVD-PAL), 16:9
Video data rate: 6000 kbps
Audio data rate: 256 kbps
Dolby Digital Audio, 48 KHz, 2/0(L,R)
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